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On this day in Lewis & Clark history...

As they paddle up the Columbia River, the Expedition passes Sauvie Island and the Lewis River. They see large Indian villages and many ponds with blooming wapato. They camp on the Washington side near present Ridgefield.

we arrived at the village of the Cath-lah-poh-tle wich consists of 14 large wooden houses.

Meriwether Lewis

the river is now riseing very fast and retards our progress very much

William Clark

Chinook plank house near Cathlapotle

Replica of a Chinook plank house near Cathlapotle

the river is now riseing very fast and retards our progress very much as we are compelled to keep out at Some distance in the Curent to clear the bushes, and fallin trees and drift logs makeing out from the Shore.

William Clark

Columbia River

Bushes and a tree hanging out over the water

at the distance of three miles above the entrance of the inlet on the N. side behind the lower point of an island we arrived at the village of the Cath-lah-poh-tle wich consists of 14 large wooden houses.

Meriwether Lewis

Esquimalt Indian village (Vancouver Island)

Historic painting of a Coastal Indian village

Painting by Paul Kane based on sketches made in 1847.

they are also fond of sculpture. various figures are carved and painted on the peices which support the center of the roof, about their doors and beads.

Meriwether Lewis

proceeded up on the N E. of an Island to an inlet about 1 mile above the village and encamped on a butifull grassy plac, where the nativs make a portage of their Canoes and Wappato roots to and from a large pond at a Short distance.
in this pond the nativs inform us they Collect great quantities of pappato, which the womin collect by getting into the water, Sometimes to their necks holding by a Small canoe and with their feet loosen the wappato or bulb of the root from the bottom from the Fibers, and it imedeately rises to the top of the water, they Collect & throw them into the Canoe, those deep roots are the largest and best roots.

William Clark

Pond at Cathlapotle

Green and brown grasses surrounding a marshy pond

the wappetoe furnishes the principal article of traffic with these people which they dispose of to the nations below in exchange for beads cloth and various articles. the natives of the Sea coast and lower part of the river will dispose of their most valuable articles to obtain this root.

Meriwether Lewis

Germinated wapato bulbs, Sagittaria latifolia

Germinated Wapato bulbs

the female of the duck which was described yesterday is of a uniform dark brown with some yellowish brown intermixed in small specks on the back neck and breast.

Meriwether Lewis

Female ring-necked duck, Aythya collaris

Ring-necked Duck: black duck with white wings

Photo © Davefoc. Permission via the GNU Free Documentation License.

the frogs are croaking in the swams and marhes; their notes do not differ from those of the Atlantic States

Meriwether Lewis

Pacific tree frog, Pseudacris regilla

Small, green frog on a rock

Photo by the U.S. Geological Survey.

saw several of the crested fishers and some of the large and small black-birds.—

Meriwether Lewis

Belted kingfisher, Ceryle alcyon
Common grackle, Quiscalus quiscula
Brewer's blackbird, Euphagus cyanocephalus

Three small black birds compared

Belted Kingfisher photo ©2008 Kevin Cole. Permission via the Creative Commons 2.0 License.
Common grackle photo ©2005 Mdf. Permission via the Creative Commons 3.0 License.
Brewer's blackbird photo created by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.