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On this day in Lewis & Clark history...

The elk hunters continue to be successful and Reubin Field brings an Oregon ruffed grouse to Fort Clatsop. The Indian canoe that went adrift several days ago is found. The Captains describe the western hemlock.

Fir No. 2…is much the most common species, it may be sad to constitute at least one half of the timber in this neighbourhood.
the wood is white throughout and reather soft but very tough, and difficult to rive.

Meriwether Lewis

Western hemlock, Tsuga heterophylla

Large Western hemlock on the bank of a coastal river

Photo taken by Jo Ann Townsend with permission at Lewis and Clark National Historic Park, Fort Clatsop.

I sent sergt. Gass and a party of men over…and in their way fortunately recovered our Indian Canoe, so long lost and much lamented.
Filds brought with him a phesant which differed but little from those common to the Atlantic states…

Meriwether Lewis

Ruffed grouse, Bonasa umbellus

Small game bird with feathers of reds, grays, browns, and blacks

Photo by unknown photographer. Permission via the Creative Commons 3.0 License.

We had a beautiful pleasant cool morning.

Joseph Whitehouse

Fort Clatsop

Fort Clatsop parade grounds on a sunny day

Photo taken with permission at Lewis and Clark National Historic Park, Fort Clatsop.

Fir No. 2…is much the most common species, it may be sad to constitute at least one half of the timber in this neighbourhood. the wood is white throughout and reather soft but very tough, and difficult to rive.

Meriwether Lewis

Western hemlock, Tsuga heterophylla

Close-up of Western hemlock needles and cone

Photo by Ebustad who has released it to the public domain.