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On this day in Lewis & Clark history...

Only three of the elk shot previously are found due to the recent snows. Howard and Werner bring some salt to Fort Clatsop. Today's Lewis and Clark River was named Netul after the Clatsop name for that river.

the river on which Fort Clatsop stands we now call Ne-tul, this being the name by which the Clatsops call it.

Meriwether Lewis

Netul Landing Sunset (Fort Clatsop)

Blue sky and sunset on a coastal river in January

Photo taken with permission at Lewis and Clark National Historic Park, Fort Clatsop.

about noon Howard and Werner returned with a supply of salt;
the badness of the weather and the difficulty of the road had caused their delay.

Meriwether Lewis

Along the Fort to Sea Trail

Tangled mess of blow-downs cluttering up the forest

Photo taken with permission at Lewis and Clark National Historic Park, Fort Clatsop.

The wood of this tree is excessively hard when seasoned.
the natives make great uce of it to form their wedges with which they split their boards of pine for the purpose of building houses. these wedges they also employ in spliting their fire-wood and in hollowing out their canoes. I have seen the natives drive the wedges of this wood into solid dry pine which it cleft without fracturing or injuring the wedge in the smallest degree.
we have also found this wood usefull to us for ax handles as well as glutts or wedges.
The bark of this tree is chewed by our party in place of tobacco.

Meriwether Lewis

Oregon crabapple, Malus fusca

Bumpy and knotty bark of a medium-sized tree

Photo © Br. Alfred Brousseau, Saint Mary's College.