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On this day in Lewis & Clark history...

Several Indians visit Fort Clatsop to trade food, woven mats, and elk hides. One gives wapato roots in exchange for having his musket repaired. The latrines are dug and a small sentry box is built to keep the guard dry.

those people brought with them Some Wappato roots, mats made of flags and rushes dried fish, and a fiew Shaw-na täh-que and Dressed Elk Skins, all of which they asked enormous prices for, perticularly the dressed Elk Skins    I purchased of those people Some Wap pa to two mats and about 3 pipes of their tobacco in a neet little bag made of rushes

William Clark

Wapato on a cattail mat

Wapato roots on a woven mat

Photo taken with permission at Lewis and Clark National Historic Park, Fort Clatsop.

With the party of Clât Sops who visited us last was a man of much lighter Coloured than the nativs are generaly,
he was freckled with long duskey red hair, about 25 years of age

William Clark

Fort Clatsop sentinel box

Small shed attached to the side of the fort

Photo taken with permission at Lewis and Clark National Historic Park, Fort Clatsop.

fowls of various kinds are in great numbers in the rivers and Creeks and the sides of Meriwethers Bay near us but excessively wild—

William Clark

Fort Clatsop marsh

Numerous waterfowl taking flight in a coastal marsh during a flood tide

Photo taken with permission at Lewis and Clark National Historic Park, Fort Clatsop.

Snakes are yet to be seen, and Snales without Cover is Common and large

William Clark

Slug

Slimy slug on a log