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On this day in Lewis & Clark history...

The Expedition navigates the last of the difficult Snake River rapids and arrives at the Columbia River. While camped on the point between the two rivers, 200 friendly warriors from a nearby village arrive singing and dancing.

Towards evening we arrived at a large fork that came into this River from a Northerly direction & was much large than the fork which we descended... The country round where the forks of these two Rivers lay was level & smooth barren plains...

Joseph Whitehouse

Sunset at the Snake and Columbia River confluence

Confluence of Snake and Columbia Rivers

Photo taken at Sacajawea State Park.

A cool morning

William Clark

Snake River below Ice Harbor Dam

Barren shores and blue water of the lower Snake River

we halted our Canoes above the Rapid. We carried a considerable quantity of our baggage about a Mile by land below this rapid.— We got all our canoes safe over this difficult place & loaded them and proceeded on down the River;

Joseph Whitehouse

Snake River at Big Flat Habitat Management Unit

Barren shores, Snake River, and yellow rabbit brush in October

In every direction from the junction of those rivers the Countrey is one Continued plain low and rises from the water gradually, except a range of high Countrey which runs from S. W & N E and is on the opposit Side about 2 miles distant from the Collumbia and keeping its derection S W untill it joins a S W. range of mountains.

William Clark

Confluence of Snake and Columbia Rivers

Two dugout canoes in the Columbia River

Photo taken at Sacajawea State Park.

after Smokeing with the Indians who had collected to view us we formed a camp at the point near which place I Saw a fiew pieces of Drift wood

William Clark

Columbia River

Large, drift logs with large rive in the background

Great quantities of a kind of prickley pares, much worst than any I have before Seen of a tapering form and attach themselves by bunches.

William Clark

Panhandle prickly pear, Opuntia polyacantha

a very prickly plant

about 200 men Singing and beeting on their drums Stick and keeping time to the musik,
they formed a half circle around us and Sung for Some time

William Clark

Wanapum people

Historic photo of Indians dancing at a rodeo

hoto by Burrell courtesy of Nez Perce National Historical Park, NEPE 1605.