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On this day in Lewis & Clark history...

Through rain and hail, the Expedition travels along mountain ridges and across steep valleys. They ford Crooked Fork at an Indian fish weir, and then continue to an island on the Lochsa River at Powell, Idaho. They kill a colt for food.

Encamped opposit a Small Island at the mouth of a branch on the right side of the river which is at this place 80 yards wide, Swift and Stoney

William Clark

Lochsa River, Powell, Idaho

Small island in a stoney river surrounded by a dense forest

a Cloudy day in the Valies it rained and hailed
we named the South fork Colt killed Creek

William Clark

Colt Killed Creek

Clear, rocky mountain stream

we Set out as usal, and ascended a mountain about 4 miles, then descended it down to on the forks of the creek where it ran verry rapid and is full of rocks.

John Ordway

Brushy Fork Creek

Large boulders in small mountain stream

ascended a mountain covrd. with pine. abt. 4 miles we descended it down on the Creek at a fork where it ran very rapid and full of rocks.

Joseph Whitehouse

Brushy Fork Creek

we Crossed to the left Side at the foks, and Crossd a verry high Steep mountain for 9 miles to a large fork from the left which appears to head in the Snow toped mountains Southerley and S. E.

William Clark

Bitterroot Mountains viewed from Beaver Ridge

Snow-capped mountains on a cloudy day

Photo © 2009 by Gene Eastman. Some modern items have been digitally obscured.

The Mountains which we passed to day much worst than yesterday the last excessively bad & Thickly Strowed with falling timber & Pine Spruc fur Hackmatak & Tamerack, Steep & Stoney our men and horses much fatigued

William Clark

Western larch (Tamarack), Larix occidentalis

Rough bark on a Tamarack tree

We continued on our way on the top of this mountain where we had a most delightful prospect of the Hills & Vallies which lay below us

Joseph Whitehouse

View from Beaver Ridge

Snow-capped mountains and deep forest valley on a cloudy day

Photo © 2009 by Gene Eastman.

went over another large mountain, on which I saw service-berry bushes hanging full of fruit; but not yet ripe, owing to the coldness of the climate on these mountain

Patrick Gass

Serviceberries, Amelanchier alnifolia

Red, immature serviceberries

we Crossd. Glade Creek above its mouth, at a place the Tushepaws or Flat head Indians have made 2 wears across to Catch Sammon and have but latterly left the place

William Clark

Crooked Fork

Wide shallow creek with smooth round stones

we proceeded on 2 miles & Encamped opposit a Small Island at the mouth of a branch on the right side of the river which is at this place 80 yads wide, Swift and Stoney, here we wer compelled to kill a Colt for our men & Selves to eat for the want of meat & we named the South fork Colt killed Creek, and this river we Call Flathead River—

William Clark

Camp of September 14, 1805